Preparing to sell your home can be a big, expensive job. There are improvements and repairs to be made that can be costly. We’re not in favour of over-improving your place prior to listing your home for sale. We are, however, in favour of small improvements to lift the value of your house while keeping investment to return ratio within bounds. That’s why we urge you to first speak with your house stylists Sydney. Real estate can be amazingly rewarding, but not if you spend your profits before you sell.

Lately, we’ve been talking here about just such mini-improvements and how they can give your property new life without breaking the bank. If you’ve surprised yourself, through carefully decluttering your kitchen, you may find today’s suggestions particularly interesting. By putting rarely used items like your Christmas turkey platter and the roaster you use to cook the bird into storage you may suddenly find yourself with tons of cabinet space. Now it’s time to get creative. First, let us review.
When people look at houses, they do so with something like a New Year’s resolution list in their heads. Home shoppers have told themselves that with this new house they will do a better job of keeping clutter at bay. They WILL do a better job of coaching their children to keep cleaner rooms, and they plan to save grocery shopping money by having a well-organised kitchen.

Understanding what’s going on in the minds of your prospective buyers can help you make decisions about pre-listing projects that will kindle love. Short of buying and installing brand new cabinets in your kitchen, think about adding a few of the aforementioned bells and whistles to the ones you have. Adding organisational helpers can work brilliantly.
Drawers

Kitchen drawers are often bulging with rarely used tools and gadgets that won’t have made the cut when you declutter. Why keep things that are simply space-taker-uppers? Now that you’ve pared down the volume of stuff you keep in drawers, why not add a few pre-made drawer organisers?
These clever drawer inserts can be made from bamboo, plastic, or even metal mesh. They come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes that can accommodate everything from bamboo skewers to cookie cutters. Spending $15.00 or less per drawer can melt the heart of any family’s cook.
Slide-Out Racks

Before you go shopping at one of the many online stores that offer these amenities, talk with your team of house stylists Sydney. Millennium buyers have pretty specific needs, but they are ripe to fall in love with an organised kitchen space.
When cabinets are deep and dark, things get lost. Some genius invented entire systems to enable you to pull out drawers within those cavernous cabinets, revealing all the goodies that reside within. Whether you install a sturdy wire rack pull-out to hold your blender and other small appliances, or an entire drawer unit to fit snuggly within the cabinet, this project can essentially retro-build your cabinetry with all the space-saving options the original cabinetmaker forgot.
Next, just let your imagination run wild with the concept of an organised space under the kitchen sink. It boggles the mind.

Imagine having your lids all standing at attention and waiting to be called upon in a slide out drawer right beside your pots and pans. For about $50.00, you can add new utility to just about any cabinet – much, much less than you would spend on new cabinetry.
Specialty Racks

If you’re like most cooks, you yearn for a dedicated space for pizza pans, biscuit sheets, and cutting boards. For a remarkably small investment you can add a pre-made divider unit to provide just that. And, why stop with muffin pans? You can install these to work with cake pans, casserole dishes, and even your every-day dinnerware.

With a little help from your house stylists Sydney, home-sellers can beef up their kitchen’s organisational profile in a serious way. Adding these DIY gems will make a big difference for just a little cash. Best of all, by saving on kitchen organisation and appeal, you’ll have more money to spend on your NEW kitchen.

Written by