The sale of your home is a very big production. It requires the talent of many people to make it a hit. Staging property and the people who provide such services should be your first call in order to set the stage for this, probably the biggest, business deal you’ve ever entered into.
Home stylists, or property stagers as they are sometimes called, take care of all the preliminary “dressing” of your house before the curtain goes up.

When you bring in a professional stylist, you’ll be taking the step most real estate selling agents think is the most important first leg of your real estate journey. Professional stylists can be your best investment in this process. Not only does a stylist come into your home, take measurements, and prepare a plan for you, he or she will help you ensure that your home will sell for top dollar.

Your stylist’s job includes preparing the home for visits by prospective buyers. Before those buyers walk in you want to be sure your home is not just squeaky clean, but also absolutely breathtakingly beautiful. Your furnishings and décor must match the tastes of the buyers you hope to attract. To do this, stylists bring in rooms full of furnishings that complement the style of your home and flatter its architecture. They address window treatments and lighting fixtures to be sure the lighting in your home shows the rooms off in their very best…well, light.

Your buyer wants space, space, and more space. For this reason, your stylist will arrange everything within your home to play up the fact that the home has room to expand. Not only will furnishings be carefully selected and arranged, even things such as cabinets and shelves will be appointed in a way that demonstrates that the home is bigger than it appears.

Staging property for sale can also mean some suggested repairs and renovations. When your stylist recommends things such as this, it’s because he or she knows that it will impact and improve your bottom line. These repairs might include a change in the colour of the bathroom fixtures or the walls in the hallway. Sometimes, it means refinishing the hardwood floors in the living room. These steps might seem unnecessary to you, but the stylists know that if a feature of your home doesn’t show well, the house might sit on the market longer — which costs you money.

Avoiding a slow sale is one of your two biggest goals. The other is to make sure that the house returns every cent of your investment possible at closing. When prospective buyers see a home that doesn’t require maintenance up front and is ‘move-in ready’, the buyer sees dollar signs in his or her favour. Because he or she doesn’t have to plan for the expense of refinishing the floors, for example, he is apt to make a larger offer.

The trick to making these renovations and repairs money-making ones is in your familiarity with costs and returns on them. It would make no sense to refinish those floors if you had to pay more to make the repairs than the buyer will spend to own them. This is where the services of professional property stylists shine. These real estate professionals have access to mountains of data and research that clearly demonstrate which repairs and changes net the most money at closing. Plus, if that knowledge were not enough, your stylist can arrange for the cleaning, repairs, the painting, and whatever other services your house needs at the best prices available.

The cost to have your home styled before listing is a wise investment. Real estate sales groups have proven that a styled home will sell at 7.5 to 12.5 percent higher than it might otherwise. That’s money in the bank.

When you’re ready to begin your real estate adventure, make your first call to Urban Chic Property Styling. We have been successfully staging property in Sydney for many, many years and have a reputation for perfection. We can offer the bonus of having a successful former sales agent as our senior design specialist – so you can count on our expertise to make your property sale the best it can be. Call us today and let us help you improve your profit.

Written by