We stand by our previous pronouncement. Wardrobes speak volumes about you and your lifestyle. They can also give away information about your house that’s not always true. Your master bedroom wardrobe may complain that you keep putting boxes of Christmas ornaments on its shelves even though you have a perfectly useable space in the garage. An overcrowded or disorganised wardrobe anywhere in your house is a red flag to buyers. It says: “This house doesn’t have enough storage space”. Your buyer, who is interested in having plenty of space available, may make the decision to buy or not to buy your home on the testimony of your wardrobes.

When you realise that your wardrobes are telling tales out of school, it’s time to consult with someone who has experience in staging and property styling Sydney homes. Professional home stylists can lead you down the path to a better-behaved wardrobe in no time at all. We consider the wardrobe organisation systems available at your home improvement store a great investment. First, however, you must create a storage plan that will work not just for you, but for a broad range of buyers. (This is where your home stylist comes in. He or she can give you invaluable advice on this and any number of other topics.)

As you plan the best use for your wardrobe space, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Think carefully about your buyer’s needs. Your buyer, as your professional in staging and property styling Sydney can tell you, is young and upwardly mobile. Make sure you plan for motorcycle helmets and kayaking clothes, for example.
  • Take careful measurements of the space you have available. Particularly if you’re planning a timber organisation system, you’ll need measurements down the eyelash. Timber cannot be bunched up or pleated and cutting off sections may or may not leave you with a functional system. Draw the wardrobe space on graph paper and make sure all the measurements, including the size of the door and the distance between wall and door jamb, are reflected there before you go to the home improvement store.
  • Plan for storage. Drawers and shelves are an important part of your storage plan. Drawers for shirts, sweaters, and undergarments should be part of your design, but be sure the highest shelf is no higher than your chest. Add shelves for the hats, caps, shoes, and other items you want to store visibly. With pre-fab wardrobe organiser components, you can add adjustable shelves for more flexibility.
  • Rods and racks: Plan for multiple rods to give you the space to hang shirts, suits, dresses and trousers. Now rods can be arranged in your wardrobe with smaller areas for shirts and tops and longer, full-length spaces for dresses, robes, and coats. Racks can help you organise belts, ties, and scarves. There are even pull-out racks that can, when extended, make it easier to see all your trousers at one time.
  • Lighting is also a factor in organising your built-in wardrobe, so do install a fixture that is both attractive and efficient, lest your shirts and socks be mismatched.

Wardrobe organising systems come in everything from coated wire, that is durable and inexpensive, to pre-made melamine modules that can be mixed and matched to create an outstanding storage space. Naturally, there are also custom wardrobe organisers, but this investment is actually for the purpose of making your home more attractive for somebody else. Your investment shouldn’t out-strip your purpose.

Before you begin the process of establishing a more sophisticated wardrobe space, speak with a property stylist. We cannot stress enough that you need to know your buyer. The wardrobe needs of a retired couple may be vastly different than those of the standard skydiver.

As people who study the characteristics of today’s home buyer, house staging and property styling Sydney professionals can provide valuable insights about how much to spend and what wardrobe options are best for your project. When you’re ready to launch your wardrobe project, give Urban Chic Property Styling a call. Together we can deal with that tattle-tale wardrobe.

 

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